“I’ll Buy Your Book and You Buy Mine” Program

Authors on Twitter seem to be an engaged and loyal group.

I’ve been tweeting for years now, under many different handles, but my tweeting has been very sporadic.  Today, I have two Twitter accounts that I am actively using; one for my day job, and one for my writing (@ScottJThurman).   As I’ve started using Twitter more, I’ve noticed that the more engaged you are, the faster your “followers” grow, and you actually start forming friendships, and having interesting conversations!  Maybe even a nemesis or two.

I’ve also noticed how eager the author twitter community is to help and support each other.  I’ve already bought several books, that I wouldn’t have otherwise, just because the author and I shared a few “likes” on Twitter.  Hence, I am proposing a “You Buy My Book and I’ll Buy Yours” program, which is a list of people that will buy your book, on the assumption that you will buy theirs. It’s an honor system, at least until I can figure out how to correlate sales to participation. 🙂

Here are the rules:

  1. Join the list.  I’ve started a list on my Twitter Account (@ScottJThurman) called “Buy My Book”.  You are welcome to subscribe.
  2. Follow all of the Authors on the list and watch for their book promotions.  My book, Suicide By Everest comes out on Amazon on October 28th!
  3. Buy a book, and let the author know that you bought it, and provide a link to the book you would like them to buy in return.
  4. Preference should be given to an author that just published.  According to Amazon, those first few days are critical for future sales. As well as…
  5. Review: Give an honest review of the book.  I plan on blogging about the books I read, and I will always give my honest review.

If you are interested in joining let me know. If you have a book you want me to buy and review let me know.   If you have any ideas on the program itself, please comment, I am interested in hearing from you.

Thanks!  Scott

To Blog, or Not To Blog

blog icon information internet

Should a person Blog? Tweet? Post? Is it in his/her best interest?

If so, then why? What is the objective?

Should you separate your Twitter activity from your Facebook activity, or should you try to meld them all together?

These are the questions that I’m trying to figure out, so if you have any insight, please add your voice, but here is how I’m breaking it down:

  1. WordPress (scottthurman.com) is my writing Blog.  I will use this primarily for promoting me, my book and any future writing.  There may be some personal bits, but it must somehow tie back to my writing.
  2. Twitter (@scottjthurman) is a micro-blog.  It works in conjunction with my WordPress website.  I’ve been spending a lot of time on Twitter lately, building up my “following”, and I enjoy it.  It’s sort of a way of keeping score.
  3. LinkedIn is for business networking.   In general, this is where I put my resume. I need to explore how LinkedIn supports authors/writers.
  4. Skype: I haven’t really used Skype for personal business, though I don’t know why not.  My Skype name is scott_thurman
  5. WeChat: This is the Twitter of China. My WeChat handle is MenciusScott
  6. Facebook: Appears to have jumped the shark.  I visit facebook once or twice a day, but Twitter has become my go-to social networking app. FB will be for updating and being updated by family and friends.  It’s not a place I will be regularly promoting my writing.
  7. Instagram: Username is thurm2012.  Haven’t used it that much, but seems popular with many.  There is a way to coming them together.
  8. WhatsApp
  9. Yelp
  10. Google+
  11. Goodreads Author Page
  12. Amazon Author Page

 

Social Networking Filter on High

Earlier today I tweeted something about SUICIDE and within seconds I regretted it and deleted it.  It was fairly mundane, but I could see where somebody who had lost a loved one or struggled with suicidal thoughts, might take offense.   So, to be on the safe side I deleted it.  It got me thinking about all the filters I run my social networking posts through, and wondered if I’ve set it too high, or too low?  What factors go into a tweeter’s decision to post or not post something.

Here are a few I came up with:

  • Family filter: If I say this, and my wife or kids see it, will I be embarrassed? If one of their friends sees it, knowing that I’m their husband/father, will they be embarrassed, made fun of, or otherwise harassed. Yes? No? Maybe?
  • Work filter: I work for a Fortune 500 company that is very protective of their IP and their brand.  People have lost their jobs by posting the wrong things, so I stay completely away from anything day-job related.
  • Brand filter: We all have a brand whether we like it, know it, or not. Shy, cocky, annoying, confident, etc…   I’m trying to build a brand with my writing. Violent, American/Chinese, intriguing, surprising, Tarantinoesque…  I would like to sell a lot of my books, and I have started to develop a “tribe” using social networking tools.  More and more I find that I’m checking myself before I wreck myself.  I believe it’s a good thing from a sales and marketing perspective, but it’s also sad that we now live in a world (America?) where having a different opinion might cost you a sale, or worse ruin your career. This morning I was watching the news and there was a story about how the Barbie brand had reinvented itself after losing sales and market share for the last few years.  They came up with a product line of Barbie’s that crossed all sorts of barriers and boundaries. The reporter made some comment about something called the United Colors of Benetton Barbie.  Then the reporter asked the Barbie representative “Would Barbie ever take a position on a political and/or social issue, and she said matter of factly, ‘no, we don’t want to offend anybody.'”

Thoughts? What filters do you use, if any?  What high/low is your social networking setting?